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H5.04 - Self-Folding Biocompatible Devices for Single Cell Capture and Analysis 
Date/Time:
December 2, 2014   9:00am - 9:15am
 
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The analysis of the biomolecular milieu within and around individual cells in a high-throughput manner and the ability to monitor biochemical changes of a specific cell and during cell division over time provide a means to understand progressive or dynamical events that might otherwise be averaged away in a population wide analysis. Hence, a long standing challenge in engineering has been the identification, capture and analysis of single cells with high sensitivity and selectivity. Previously in our group we have developed self-folding SiO2/SiO single cell grippers in a large array, which can capture individual live fibroblast cell and red blood cell [1]. Here, we leverage the optical transparency of the devices to analyze captured cells in situ through optical modalities. We will discuss surface patterning of the devices with optical molecular probes and studies on biomolecular detection and analysis of intra and extracellular biomolecules.

[1] K. Malachowski, M. Jamal, Q. Jin, B. Polat, C. Morris, and D. H. Gracias, “Self-folding single cell grippers,” Nano Letters, 2014, DOI: 10.1021/nl500136a.
 


 
 
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